Health, housing and life

Matters such as health, living, mobility, education and child-rearing, city administration, and employment form part of the social infrastructure in the places in which we live, and for that reason they should be designed to create equitable living conditions for all people. However, it is increasingly the case that the profit motive dictates the way these matters are arranged. What would fair, truly social infrastructure look like, and can we achieve this?

More and more expensive! - Questions and answers on inflation and the energy crisis

Prices are rising and rising. More and more people are asking themselves how they are going to survive the next few months in view of the high costs of energy and food. There is a lot of criticism of the government's measures, because the relief measures that have been decided are only a drop in the ocean for many. The political left protests for alternatives and demands redistribution. At the beginning of this discussion, there are many questions: what actually is inflation? How does the gas levy work? Are higher wages to blame for the increase in prices? Here you will find answers to these and other questions from the left perspective.

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The Uranium Atlas

Uranium mining mostly takes place on the land of indigenous peoples in the Global South and poses extreme risks to the environment and to people’s health. Nuclear power is extremely costly, and scientists are still unsure about how to store radioactive waste. The Uranium Atlas provides an overview of data and facts that are important to answer questions about Uranium.

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The Water Crisis in Cape Town

For many people, water is a resource that is simply always available rather than something they really have to think about. But things won’t stay this way. Recent summers in Europe have been marked by dryness, drought, dusty topsoil, and poor harvests. This documentary about the South African city of Cape Town shows the impact of severe water shortage.

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Who Owns the City?

This video explains in brief who owns Berlin. It dispels both the myth about the friendly, small-scale private landlord as a key player in the real estate market as well as the myth about property ownership being a form of universal social protection.

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